Aunt Vadge: The tip (with a condom on) went in – could I be pregnant?

Hello Aunt Vadge,

I’m 16 years old. Me and my boyfriend (18) wanted to have sex. It was my first time and I was nervous plus excited. When he entered his penis in me, I got a lot of pain and a bit of blood had come. He didn’t enter it completely, only the top part of this penis had gone inside (less than 1 inch) and then I asked him to stop. I was a bit insecure about losing my virginity so while having sex, when his penis was entering my vagina, I just stopped.

He used condoms and did not even cum. My periods are five days late and I don’t know what to do. We had sex on 8th Jan. My periods were supposed to come on 14th Jan and today is 19th Jan. Right now Im having pain in my legs and lower abdomen. I dont think there is any chance of pregnancy in this case, but I’m very tensed.

Yours,
Tense
Age: 16
Country/Area: United Arab Emirates

_____

Dear Tense,

There is almost zero chance of you being pregnant if your boyfriend’s penis didn’t touch – without a condom over it – your vagina, and there was no semen or precum. The pain is probably due to your period. Get yourself a period tracker app, and learn about how to tell when you’re ovulating so you know in future when your fertile time of your cycle is.

Periods hardly ever follow a strict month-by-month schedule, and once you start tracking, you’ll see that the time between periods changes, sometimes by quite a few days. This is completely normal. If you ask around your friends, you’ll find that you all have different numbers of days between periods. Anything between 24 – 35 days (from the start of one period until the start of the next) is considered perfectly fine. The 28-day cycle is actually a myth, and they just used the average of all women’s cycles, despite the fact that this – for each of you – is just incorrect. Sometimes it will be 28 days.

If you are worried about being pregnant and it’s just happened, you can also try getting the morning after emergency contraceptive pills. These pills work to stop you ovulating (in case you haven’t already) for up to 72 hours. It’s worth a try, if you can get your hands on some. We’ve got a morning-after pill cheat sheet here for using regular contraceptive pills as the morning-after pills, and how many you should use from someone else’s pills. Some countries have these pills over the counter at the pharmacy. In future, having some combined oral contraceptive pills stashed is a VERY handy thing to have, for you and your friends to use as needed. Keep the cheat sheet handy, so you always know how many to take.

Write anytime!

Warmest regards
Aunt Vadge

 

Jessica Lloyd - Naturopathic Practitioner, BHSc(N)

Jessica Lloyd - Naturopathic Practitioner, BHSc(N)

Jessica is a degree-qualified naturopath (BHSc) specialising in vulvovaginal health and disease, based in Melbourne, Australia.

Jessica is the owner and lead naturopath of My Vagina, and is a member of the:

  • International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Disease (ISSVD)
  • International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health (ISSWSH)
  • National Vulvodynia Association (NVA) Australia
  • New Zealand Vulvovaginal Society (ANZVS)
  • Australian Traditional Medicine Society (ATMS)
Read more about Jessica and My Vagina's origin story.